Tag Archives: film review

Inni

That’s only partially due to the Icelandic post-rockers’ otherworldly approach to music. Shot during a two-night stand in 2008 at London’s historic Alexandra Palace, French-Canadian director Vincent Morisset transferred digital footage to 16mm film, then again, through prisms and “found objects,” according to the “Inní­­” website. Combined with the abstract and always beautiful cinematography, the

Page One: Inside the New York Times

Startling admission: As a career-long journalist in one form or another, it is difficult for me to be truly objective about the documentary “Page One: Inside The New York Times.” No such problem exists with the Times’ own Michael Kinsley, who panned it as “a mess,” but don’t listen to him — I’m guessing most

We Are What We Are

Father knows best, but when the patriarch pukes up bile on the sidewalk and dies a most undignified death, that leaves the clan on their own for food. His two sons man a watch stand at an outdoor flea market to support the fam, but one of the young men’s hotheadedness gets them kicked out.

Stake Land

In this film by director/co-writer Jim Mickle (“Mulberry Street”), the monsters are a mix of zombies and vampires. The characters call them “vamps,” but if not for the fangs, you wouldn’t think “bloodsuckers” at all. You may, however, think “horses,” because I swear the sounds of their attack-mode hiss contains an equestrian whinny. Co-writer Nick

Poetry

It’s ironic that “Poetry” would open with the image of a dead body floating near the film’s superimposed title, but the best of world cinema subverts viewers’ expectations. Director Lee Chang-dong (“Secret Sunshine”) does that through the entirety of this Cannes-blessed work from South Korea, even before it begins: Doesn’t a drama about a woman

Call Me Bwana

Its flimsiest of plots posits that a moon probe has accidentally crash-landed among the dangerous Ekele tribe in Africa, and the Americans need to nab it before it falls into the hands of another nation. The U.S. government calls upon Matthew Merriwether (Hope), a published expert on the continent who claims to have shaken hands

Bitter Coco

Last year’s debacle over “The Tonight Show” didn’t quite reach Shakespearean proportions, but you sure couldn’t tell it at the time. When Jay Leno left the hallowed television franchise for a stab at prime time, NBC gave the coveted late-night slot to Conan O’Brien, who had been patiently waiting in the latelate-night wings. Things did

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